Digital Video and HD: Luma and Chroma Explained

Digital Video and HD: Luma and Chroma Explained

Video compression occurs through a number of complicated processes, and this complexity is increased by the abundance of techniques, schemes, and standards available for compressing video. The building blocks of video compression are the concepts of luma and chroma. Luma signals are formed to represent lightness and, with component video, two chroma or color difference signals are formed to represent color. Every type of video system utilizes subsampling to reduce the color components (and thus, the bandwidth), taking advantage of the human eye’s poor acuity for chroma at high spatial frequencies. This article explores how linear signals (R, G, and B) are manipulated to form the components and positioning necessary for a variety of video types, including component digital video.

This article comes from the book, Digital Video and HD: Algorithms and Interfaces, Second Edition, published by Morgan Kaufmann. Grow your mind with Intel.

 


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